Archive for the 'Architecture' Category

Walking House

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

WALKING HOUSE is a modular dwelling system that enables persons to live a peaceful nomadic life, moving slowly through the landscape or cityscape with minimal impact on the environment. It collects energy from its surroundings using solar cells and small windmills. There is a system for collecting rain water and a system for solar heated hot water. A small greenhouse unit can be added to the basic living module, to provide a substantial part of the food needed by the Inhabitants. A composting toilet system allows sewage produced by the inhabitants to be disposed of. A small wood burning stove could be added to provide CO2 neutral heating. Walking house forms various sizes of communities or WALKING VILLAGES when more units are added together. Walking house is not dependant on existing infrastructure like roads, but moves on all sorts of terrain.

Each unit is equipped with the basic systems for maintaining everyday life for a maximum of four persons. But it could easily be scaled up for larger family structures. Furniture is an integrated part of the structure. The module can be constructed from numerous materials. It is based on a framework made of steel, aluminum or wood and can be covered with steel, aluminum, wood or even semi- permeable textiles. Windows are made of polycarbonate. Insulation could be anything from thin plates of Polyethylene to wool.

Walking house could easily be equipped with specialized modules for various forms of productions like greenhouses, small factories etc. A Walking house or a Walking village could supply means for the inhabitants to make a living in this way while moving through the Landscapes and cityscapes. As an example a Walking village could be specialized in foodproduction or special modules for fishfarming, greenhouses and so on could be part of the construction.

Technical specifications:
Basic module:
Height: 3.5 meters
Width: 3.5 meters
Length: 3.72 meters
Weight: 1200 kg
Max speed: 60 meters/hour
Component list:
Plating and framework wood and plywood
Legs made of steel and mechanical components
12 linear actuators
solar panels
micro windmills
polycarbonate plates
interior equipment

Read more here

Dune Shaped Dubai Opera House by Zaha Hadid

Friday, August 15th, 2008

Zaha Hadid Architects have developed designs for a new opera house and cultural centre for Dubai.

The dune-shaped building is proposed for a Dubai Greek island.

The design calls for an exciting new cultural centre in the new Seven Pearls district of Dubai. This landmark development will accommodate an opera house, playhouse, arts gallery, performing arts school and themed hotel on an island in Dubai Creek just off the mainland part of the district. All of these facilities will be state of the art to host world class performances and exhibitions. The opera house will have a seating capacity of 2,500 while the playhouse will have a seating capacity of 800.

The arts gallery with 5000m2 of exhibition space is indeed a full size exhibition facility comparable to the Guggenheim Museum in New York. The hotel will accommodate guests in a 6 star setting. Sited on an island in Dubai Creek, the development will be connected to Greater Dubai by a road connection to the mainland.

The proposal houses all of the facilities within a single striking structure. The gentle winding form evokes images of mountains or sand dunes. Rising out of the ground, this form is both a part of the landscape yet very much a distinct element in the skyline. The surrounding landscape forms build up to the main building. These constitute open park spaces as well as ancillary functions such as the parking facilities and the monorail station, which are either tucked under or integrated into the andscape forms. (more…)

Transformable Balcony

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2008

Bloomframe Folding balcony
A unique design! With the click of a button window is transformed into a great balcony! Hofman Dujardin Architects has recently submitted his design draft to prestigious RedDot design award.

window transformable to balcony

Inside or Outside?
Unfortunately, nowadays often the construction of an apartment with balcony is completely omitted to save space. With Bloomframe balcony, everyone can decide if he or she needs a balcony right now.

(more…)

Micro-Compact Home

Wednesday, April 16th, 2008

micro compact home 

m-ch is a micro compact home project. The m-ch has a timber frame structure with anodised aluminium external cladding, insulated with polyurethane and fitted with aluminium frame double glazed windows and front door with security double lock; graphics can be applied for sponsors, exhibition and business use. The m-ch measures 266cm x 266cm x 266cm. The ceiling height is 198cm and the door width is 60cm. The unit weighs 2.2 tonnes.

(more…)

Blobitecture – waveform architecture

Monday, January 14th, 2008

Blobitecture from blob architecture, blobism or blobismus are terms for a current movement in architecture in which buildings have an organic, amoeba-shaped, bulging form. Though the term blob architecture was in vogue already in the mid-1990s, the word blobitecture first appeared in print in 2002. Now this word is often used to describe buildings with curved and rounded shapes.

Blobitecture example: Selfridges building in Birmingham

The term blob architecture was coined by architect Greg Lynn in 1995 in his experiments in digital design with metaball graphical software. Soon a range of architects and furniture designers began to experiment with this “blobby” software to create new and unusual forms. Despite its seeming organicism, blob architecture is unthinkable without this and other similar computer-aided design programs. Architects derive the forms by manipulating the algorithms of the computer modeling platform.

Despite the narrow interpretation of Blob architecture (i.e. that coming from the computer), the word, especially in popular parlance, has come to be associated quite widely with a range of curved or odd-looking buildings including Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (1997) and the Experience Music Project (2000), though these, in the narrower sense are not blob buildings, even though they were designed by advanced computer-aided design tools, CATIA in particular. The reason for this is that they were designed from physical models rather than from computer manipulations.

Blobitecture example: Sage Gateshead building

The first full blob building however was build in the Netherlands by Lars Spuybroek (NOX) and Kas Oosterhuis. Called the water pavilion (1993-1997) it does not only have a fully computer-based shape manufactured with computer-aided tools but also has an electronic interactive interior where sound and light can be transformed by the visitor.

Blobitecture example: Experience Music Project

A building that also can be considered an example of a blob is Peter Cook and Colin Fournier’s Kunsthaus (2003) in Graz, Austria. Other instances are Roy Mason’s Xanadu House (1979) the buildings of organicist Bart Prince and a rare excursion into the field by Herzog & de Meuron in their Allianz Arena (2005). By 2005, Norman Foster had involved himself in blobitecture to some extent as well with his brain-shaped design for the Philological Library at the Free University of Berlin and the Sage Gateshead opened in 2004.

See also: Blobitecture at Flickr, Stock photos

Sources: Wikipedia