Tudor Revival

June 5th, 2006

Based on English domestic architecture from the 1500s and 1600s, Tudor Revival gained great popularity as a residential style in America during the early 20th century (1890-1940). It can be found in such Chicago community areas as Beverly, Forest Glen and South Shore.

Tudor Revival

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Neo-Classical

June 2nd, 2006

Home style: Neo classicalNeo-Classical (Neoclassical) architecture is inspired by British Georgian designs. This well-publicized, world-class event can inspire fashion for years. At least that’s the case with the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, which showcased cutting-edge classical buildings that architects around the country emulated in their own residential and commercial designs. The Neoclassical style remained popular through the 1950s in incarnations from one-story cottages to multilevel manses.

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10 Costly Mistakes People Make When Building A New Home

May 19th, 2006

1. Selecting the Right Building Site.

This should be done prior to selecting the home design. To maximize finished value, the home plan should be designed to enhance the natural features of your building site.

2. Pitfalls of Poor Site Selection.

Some items to be careful of during the site selection process are:

  • Slope or grade of the site;
  • Water table underlying site;
  • Soil grade, quality and compatibility;
  • Geological factors ie) underground streams, earthquake faults, aquifers, and easements, underground utility lines, etc.
  • Availability of utility connections;
  • Costs of utility connectionsВ - surprisingly, some municipalities charge an incredibly high fee for hooking up to their sewer as an example.
  • Well permits and septic permits for rural site selections.
  • Adjacent properties – are they going to enhance or detract from the value of your new home? Example, gravel pit or gas station.
  • Ease of building, using the terrain to your advantage.
  • CC&R’s (Covent’s, Conditions, Restrictions) Know your requirements of the site if CC&R’s are part of the subdivision. If present read before buying the lot. This could take your budget through the roof. Example site requirements may ask for all brick, or?
  • Watch out for busy streets. They may have a negative impact on value.

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Avoid Common Home Building Mistakes

May 19th, 2006

If you are planning to build a new home, you should review the following list of items that are considered to be mistakes made by other first time home builders. Taking a few moments out of the day to read this information may save your heartache in the future.

Not enough time is spent in the planning process:

Any one who has built, or even bought a home, will tell you the importance of making a shopping list for your new home. You need to consider not just the large issues such as room count and how the fasade will fit in with the neighborhood, but also the smaller details associated with every day life.

Watch your family carefully to find out the patterns of their day. If you discover that your kids are coming in the front door and dropping their coats on the floor, you should consider the added-value of a front hallway closet. If your football playing son is leaving his shoulder pads in the kitchen, it might be a clue that you are lacking storage space. If your laundry room is overcrowded by bulk laundry products and multiple hampers, it might signify a need to an organizational system built into the laundry area in a new home.

Take plenty of time to analyze your needs, as well as your wants. Not too many people NEED 3 sinks in their kitchen. However, it may be what you want. Make your list, and take your time!

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Craftsman bungalow

May 19th, 2006

Craftsman Bungalows (1905 -1930) were originally inspired by two California brothers—Charles Sumner Green and Henry Mather Green—who practiced in Pasadena from 1893 to 1914. Its immense popularity in the United States springs from a rejection of the constraints of the Victorian era, and from the fact that it lent itself well to both modest and impressive house designs. The Craftsman Bungalow is recognized by the deliberate use of natural materials, its emphasis on structural form, and a casual relationship with the out-of-doors. Sometimes with an extra half story, the asymmetrical facade features a large front porch. The roof is low-pitched with generally front facing gable ends. The Craftsman Bungalow has exposed beams beneath overhanging eaves, projecting brackets, and a propensity toward Swiss or Japanese motifs. Native materials such as river rock were often used, and trim (timber trusses, brackets, etc.) is exposed.

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